Category Archives: systems management

Sometimes I listen to parents complain bitterly about things their toddlers – or teenagers – are doing; things which are totally age-appropriate. If you’re like me, you think to yourself, “as long as you’re a parent, you would have a … Continue reading

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Focus on How Business Software Programs are Designed Are you looking for the perfect business software program? There is no such thing as a perfect software. Every software you evaluate will do some things you like, and others you do … Continue reading

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Most entrepreneurs run a very tight business, keeping the administrative costs as low as possible and devoting all their funds to the marketing and product development side of their business. This is the right thing to do. But administrative tasks … Continue reading

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if you understand the inputs and outputs of a business, you can make intelligent decisions about how much and where to allocate your funds and your time. Continue reading

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Executives who fail to master a broad understanding of technology applications risk holding their organizations hostage to their lack of knowledge. Continue reading

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One topic that seems to create a lot of concern – with both customers requiring consulting and blog readers – is the topic of using systems to facilitate communication. There are three camps. Camp 1 is the group who is … Continue reading

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Here’s where the confusion between chaos and order, creativity and confusion begins to cost. The entrepreneur is generally a person who dislikes any restrictions on their freedom. They don’t want a boss, they don’t want to follow rules, and they don’t want to be told what to do. Creation of systems is not their strong suit. Not only that, but they resent any system to which they are subjected. But the dynamics of communicating and planning with 3 people are significantly different than the dynamics of communicating and planning with 20 people. And the challenges expand exponentially with each doubling of the workforce. Systems, the very thing renounced by the entrepreneur, are necessary to grease the wheels of a group of people trying to work together effectively. Continue reading

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In my career I have encountered countless professionals who do not know how to make a computer do anything. They can make an application do something (with varying degrees of success), but that’s different than making a computer do something. So the computer has become a god, and not to its benefit. Continue reading

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So just where does a small business get the advantage? After all, the large corporations can employ legions of McKinsey and Mercer specialists who will show them how to flatten their hierarchies, increase lateral communication, deploy technology to effectively enable teams, and engage their employees in ever-shifting flexible organizations (can you count the buzzwords I just used in that paragraph?). Small businesses don’t have large consulting budgets. Heck, most small businesses don’t have any consulting budget. Continue reading

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Think of a business as a mechanical device. A car. There are a lot of components in a car, but individually they don’t matter very much. The most comfortable driver’s seat in the world probably won’t impress you if it’s in a livingroom. A well-designed engine doesn’t perform well if it’s not fed by an efficient fuel system or good fuel. If an engineer works very very hard to develop the fastest engine on earth, but doesn’t work with the engineer designing the auto body, the car could break apart at high speeds. Making extremely good parts doesn’t guarantee an extremely good whole. The strategy, organization, and control systems of a company must be integrated. Continue reading

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